TOC for Education: Global Expansion

TOC for Education: Global Expansion

What is TOC for Education

TOCfE growing worldwide

Origins The Theory of Constraints for Education (TOCfE) was founded in 1995 by the late Dr Eliyahu Goldratt (1947-2011) with the goal to spread the logic based thinking and communication…

More...
Parents

Parents

Parents

Working with teachers to develop young minds

  Parents supporting their children's learning and behaviour development, and improved self-reliance.  Parents naturally want the best for their children. Most parents do whatever they can within their means to…

More...
Teachers

Teachers

Teachers

Thinking tools for teaching

  There are currently more than 250,000 educators teaching the TOC thinking tools in more than 24 countries around the world. Australia has now joined numerous European, South American and Asian…

More...
Students of all ages

Students of all ages

Stimulating students minds

Helping kids of all ages, backgrounds and abilities.  Page under construction

More...
School Administrators

School Administrators

School Administrators

School administrator

Theory of Constraints is a methodology to logically identify and overcome key limitations that prevent a person, organisation or system from achieving its goal.   Leadership in schools comes from…

More...
TOCfE Conference 2018

TOCfE Conference 2018

Frontpage Slideshow (by JoomlaWorks)

TOCfE Conference 2018

  TOC for Education Inc 16th International Conference  November 29 – December 1, 2018 Gdansk, Poland     Venue: European Solidarity Centre Conference Fee: US$275 ($350 after October 31)) To Register www.tocforeducation.com…

More...

Lessons should capture hearts as well as minds

Sydney Morning Herald

By Timothy Wright

This article clearly states a core problem with education and resonates with exactly the mission of TOCfE. The TOCfE logical thinking process tools are powerful enablers for Timothy Wright's vision. A vision I believe is shared by many many educators not just in Australia but worldwide.

Andrew Kay, Director TOCfE Australia Inc.

In year 11, my English gave me the challenge and freedom to pursue an interest in satire. My love of those books is undiminished 45 years later. Yet we have all had the experience of reading something because we were told to, only to realise after a couple of pages we had no idea what we read, and have to go back again.

Effective learning is an emotionally engaging process. We remember favourite stories because our emotions were powerfully engaged. In fact, accessing those memories is so much easier because of the emotion associated with the learning. The opposite is also true. When we are bored and not emotionally engaged, no amount of telling us we need to learn this for our own good will work. We slump and daydream or fiddle with our electronic diversions.

However, when it comes to learning for school students we have curriculum emphases that are content laden, often with the intellectual equivalent of castor oil – "drink this it is good for you". There is pressure to put more “stuff” in, often from those who actually do not teach or have no experience of leading others in learning.cbde41ffe570b7b93c037d9143febf401be5c4a4.png

Timothy Wright is the headmaster of Shore school.

The powers that be often do not understand the subtleties of a classroom and believe standardised curricula give standardised outcomes. They do not. It's as though the learner is seen as a hard disk; all inputs can be stored and accessed. But we now need to rely upon the research that indicates the learner is an embodied brain, with all the complexity of life. Content does matter, but so does authentic engagement with it.

Educators in schools are increasingly concerned that the curriculum is oriented too much towards getting content covered, and insufficiently towards providing time for emotionally engaging pedagogies. We have made some progress, for example, with room provided in the stage six science syllabi for depth studies, but we have a long way to go. We do not want to simply “cover” the content. We want to teach in ways that enhance not just raw knowledge, but also the socially complex skills of learning for life.

There have been so many calls over the years for the broader objectives of education to be addressed. It is cliched to talk about the need for collaboration, communication, critical thinking and the like. In truth, these have always been part of good learning. Yet curriculum design in much of the West has involved high-levels of content standardisation, often to such an extent that the time available for the creative pedagogy which develops such skills is marginalised.

Many teachers find themselves able to teach brilliantly, but could do an even better job if allowed more space to engage their charges in deeper and more emotionally connected learning. How much time is available to follow intriguing lines of thought and investigation? To allow the deep pursuit of a passionate interest, to conduct a real experiment?

At present there is an opportunity at present for NSW school educators to engage with the review of the NSW syllabus being conducted by Geoff Masters for the Minister and NESA. This is the most comprehensive NSW review since 1989. We need to make our voices heard on these issues and call for less prescription of content.

Rather, we need more space for depth in learning, particularly in stages four and five where student engagement is often at its lowest. It is true that NESA emphasises the broad outcomes, but no practising teacher believes they can ignore the precise detail in syllabus documents. It would be a transformative outcome if the result of the review were to be more time and freedom to teach and learn in emotionally engaging and engaged ways. You do not need to be driven towards what you love to do.

 

Timothy Wright has been headmaster of Shore for 16 years.

 

Additional information